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Periodontal Diseases and Genetic Disorders

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Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene that affect the structural integrity and the function of connective tissue.

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Other MFS-associated oral manifestations include which of the following?

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Clinically and genetically, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by variable degrees of skin hyperextensibility, fragility, scarring, minimal-to-moderate joint hypermobility (usually limited to the digits), and increased likelihood of bruising upon light trauma.

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Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare autosomal recessive keratodermal disorder that can manifest as periodontitis.

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Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome “characterized by multiple cutaneous lesions and tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system.”

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Individuals with neurofibromatosis type I exhibit oral manifestations in nearly what percentage of cases?

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Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive decline in memory, judgment, and cognitive skills that slowly drains an individual’s ability to perform everyday tasks.

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Periodontal inflammation is not associated with brain inflammation, neurodegeneration, and AD.

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Periodontal Diseases and Genetic Disorders
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This information is from the article Genetic Disorders and Oral Health By Rebecca Maginot, MS, Vanchit John, BDS, MDS, DDS, MSD, Christopher Dvorak, MS, LCGC and Daniel Shin, DDS, MSD. To read the article, click here.

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