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Buffering May Increase Efficacy Of Low-Dose Anesthetic Agents

Buffering May Increase Efficacy Of Low Dose Anesthetic Agents A study published in the October Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, “Buffered 1% Lidocaine With Epinephrine Can Be as Effective as Nonbuffered 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Maxillary Field Block,”

Buffering May Increase Efficacy Of Low-Dose Anesthetic Agents

A study published in the October Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery,

“Buffered 1% Lidocaine With Epinephrine Can Be as Effective as Nonbuffered 2%

Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Maxillary Field Block,” reports that by changing

the formulation’s acidity, a lower dose of lidocaine can be as effective as a

higher dose of the local anesthetic.

Researchers compared buffered 1% lidocaine with nonbuffered

2% lidocaine in 24 adult subjects (median age 23.5 years), who were tested at

the University of North Carolina Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic.

Subjects were tested with the alternate drug combinations (buffered and

nonbuffered) two weeks apart. Teeth were tested using a pulpal response to cold and

electric pulp testing on the maxillary first molar and canine at 30-minute intervals until a baseline response was detected. Participant

pain levels during the injection, as well as the time it took to numb the

midface area, were also recorded.

Among the subjects, 58% reported less pain

after receiving buffered 1% lidocaine than nonbuffered 2% lidocaine—but

no matter the drug formulation, the subjects’ reported pain levels overall were

low (averaging four on a 10-point scale). In addition, 58% of participants also

reported a shorter time to midface numbness after receiving buffered 1% lidocaine

than nonbuffered 2% lidocaine—although researchers note the difference between

the two drugs was insignificant.

These findings may lead to further studies, especially in light of the fact that

specific groups of patients could benefit from reduced drug dosages. According

to the researchers, this includes pediatric patients, “whose lidocaine drug

dosages and treatment are now limited by caution not to exceed maximum blood

lidocaine levels, based on body weight.”

Hygiene Connection E-Newsletter

November 2017

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